Building a Safer Idaho

Frequently Asked Questions - Mobile Home Rehabilitation

What do I need to know about Mobile Home Rehabilitation?

Why do you require me to go through the rehabilitation process on my mobile/manufactured home?
Title 44, Chapter 25 of Idaho Law requires the rehabilitation process to ensure affordable housing be allowed for installation in cities and counties within Idaho who have code enforcement programs. This applies to homes constructed before June 15, 1976.
All homes built on or after June 15, 1976, were built to HUD code and already meet the federal manufactured housing and safety standards act and are not required to complete the mobile home rehabilitation process.
Do I have to rehabilitate my home before I move it or after I get it to the new location?
The rehabilitation checklist must be completed and signed by the Division of Building Safety before a permit for the installation of the home may be issued by the local building jurisdiction. It is generally easier to do the rehabilitation work prior to moving the home as utility hook-ups are still available.
If I am not re-connecting my home to electricity or plumbing do I still need to complete the rehabilitation process?
If a building permit is required by your local building jurisdiction for the installation of the home then the rehabilitation process on your home is required.
If I am not moving my home do I need to complete the rehabilitation process?
No. Title 44, Chapter 25, of Idaho law only requires this process be completed if the home is being moved or reinstalled on a new foundation that requires an installation building permit from the local city or county authority having jurisdiction for building code enforcement.
If your home is located in a park it is the park's determination as to whether or not to require a rehabilitation process. If they do require the home be inspected, they must provide their own rehabilitation requirements and/or forms.
If I am converting my home to real property do I need to complete the rehabilitation process?
Yes, if a building permit is required by your local building jurisdiction to install an approved permanent foundation as part of the overall conversion to real property, then the rehabilitation process on your home is required using the Rehabilitation Checklist provided by the Division of Building Safety.
How much time is allowed to complete the rehabilitation process?
Title 44, Chapter 25, of Idaho law does not prescribe a specific period of time to complete this process; except that the rehabilitation checklist must be completed and signed by the Division of Building Safety before a permit for the installation of the home may be issued by the local building code enforcement jurisdiction.
What do I do with the rehabilitation form once it is signed by the various licensed contractors?
The Division does NOT keep a copy of this form once we have signed it and returned it to you. Please make a copy for your records before presenting it to your local building code enforcement jurisdiction to obtain your installation permit.
When can the home be re-occupied?
After all required inspections associated with the complete installation and proper connection to utilities have been performed and approved, a certificate of occupancy or other authorization to occupy must be obtained from the local building code enforcement jurisdiction.

What Costs are Involved?

How much does the rehabilitation checklist cost?
The Division of Building Safety does not currently charge a fee for the issuance of the rehabilitation checklist, technical assistance, or the final certification approval required after the rehabilitation work has been completed.
How much does it cost to rehabilitate my home?
Title 44, Chapter 25 of Idaho law does not regulate the charges allowed by licensed contractors to inspect, test, and/or make repairs to manufactured/mobile homes. It is suggested that you contact more than one of the required and appropriately licensed manufactured home installers or service companies, plumbing, HVAC, and electrical contractors to obtain estimates prior to your decision to rehabilitate the home.
Is rehabilitation and relocation worth the cost?
Not if the cost exceeds the value of the home.
Is there any place I may obtain financial assistance with the costs to rehabilitate my home?
The Division of Building Safety does not currently have the means to assist with or refer clients in financial matters. It is suggested that you contact local community action agencies, housing authorities or senior assistance programs for assistance or advice.

Does My Home Have to Meet Current Codes?

Do I have to replace the furnace in my home to a new energy efficient model?
The Mobile Home Rehabilitation process does not require new furnaces, water heaters, or any other appliances. It does require that the walls, ceilings, and doors of any compartment containing gas-fired appliances be lined with 5/16 inch or greater gypsum board for fire protection. If the compartment opens to the outside of the home the door may be of all metal construction and will not require the gypsum board.
Do I have to have my home re-wired to meet todayís electrical codes?
The Mobile Home Rehabilitation process does not specifically require your home be re-wired to meet todayís materials and code requirements. It does require that the homes existing electrical system be inspected to be in proper working order and that it meets the minimum safety standards as prescribed by Title 44, Chapter 25.
Do I have to replace all of the water, drainage, and vent systems in my home with new water, drainage, and vent piping?
The Mobile Home Rehabilitation process does not specifically require your home be re-plumbed to meet todayís modern materials and updated code requirements. It does require that the homes existing water, drainage, and vent system be pressure or flood tested and inspected to be in proper working order and that it meets the minimum safety standards as prescribed by law.
Do I have to replace the plumbing fixtures with new water conserving fixtures?
The Mobile Home Rehabilitation process does not specifically require the fixtures in your home be replaced to meet todayís materials and code requirements. It does require that the homes existing system by inspected to be in proper working order and that it meets the minimum safety standards as prescribed by law.

Who Do I Need to Hire?

Who may sign the rehabilitation form?
An Idaho licensed manufactured home installer or service company must sign items numbers 1 through 3 of the rehabilitation checklist. Item number 4 must be signed by an Idaho licensed manufactured home installer or service company or an Idaho licensed HVAC contractor. An Idaho licensed electrical contractor must sign item number 5. An Idaho licensed plumbing contractor must sign item 6.
Why canít I hire a general building contractor who holds a registration card with the Idaho Bureau of Occupational Licensing to complete work on my home and sign the rehabilitation form?
Title 44, Chapter 25, of Idaho law requires specifically licensed contractors to be used during the entire rehabilitation process.
Why canít I hire a plumbing specialty contractor to sign the plumbing line on the rehabilitation form?
A State of Idaho Plumbing Specialty Contractor is licensed to reconnect the sewer and water lines in the ground to the existing plumbing lines under the home only. This license type does not include the required schooling to complete plumbing work or systems testing inside a structure as a contractor.
Can I do the work to my home myself?
Title 44, Chapter 25, of Idaho law requires specifically licensed contractors perform any necessary electrical, gas, and water and sewer inspections or repairs. The home owner may complete other work necessary to provide required gypsum board protection within gas furnace or water heater compartments and the installation of egress windows if necessary. A licensed manufactured home installer or service company would still be required to inspect and sign off on the rehabilitation checklist that the work done was in compliance with the law.
Who is allowed to do a tear down of a mobile or manufactured home?
Idaho law requires a licensed service company or installer to tear down the home for transportation purposes.
Who can transport the home to the new site?
Hire an authorized transporter to transport the home to the new site after securing a moving permit and/or installation permit from the local building code official having jurisdiction over the new site. The mobile home installation building permit cannot be issued without the completed pre-requisite rehabilitation certification form pre-approved and signed by the Division of Building Safety.
Who may install the home at the new site?
Hire a licensed installer to re-install the home at the new site. Additional permit(s) will also be required for licensed electrical, plumbing and/or HVAC contractors to connect the utilities.
How do I find the licensed contractors to inspect my home and sign the Rehabilitation Checklist?
Licensed electrical contractors and plumbers are usually listed in the yellow pages of your phone book. Licensed manufactured housing installers or service companies may also be listed; however, if they are not you might try contacting a manufactured home retailer to obtain a referral. If the information can not be found, contact the Division of Building Safety for a list of currently licensed contractors in or around your area.